Functions reference

The following functions are available for use within WaterLP.

get

Get data from another variable, or another time step, possibly aggregated.

Arguments

Argument

Data type

Description

path (required)

string

The path of the variable (aka attribute) of interest. See note below for more detail on path construction.

flatten

boolean

Whether or not the value returned should be summed across multiple columns if the variable obtained is a multi-column dataset. Currently, most datasets are single columns, so this normally will not be used. Defaults to True.

offset

integer

Get a value from a specific time step offset. Values can be negative or positive. E.g., offset=-1 returns the value from the last time step, while offset=1 returns the value from the last time step. Offset values beyond the range of the data will result in None. Default is 0.

start

date string or Pendulum date

This indicates that the value should be aggregated from more than one time step, with start indicating the start date of the aggregation period. The value should be either a Pendulum date object or a string (e.g., 1999-10-01) that Pendulum can properly parse. Future start values are valid, though should be accompanied by a future end value as well. Default is None.

end

date string or Pendulum date

This indicates that the value should be aggregated from more than one time step, with end indicating the end date of the aggregation period. The value should be either a Pendulum date object or a string (e.g., 1999-10-01) that Pendulum can properly parse. Future end values are valid. Default is None.

agg

string

If aggregating a value (i.e., with start and/or end), this indicates how the value should be aggregated. Options include mean and sum. Default is mean.

Returns

A scalar representing the value of the target variable during the time step.

Notes

Currently, path names are constructed in one of two ways, depending on the resource type. For nodes and links:

"[network_name]/[resource_type]/[resource_name]/[attribute_name]"

where network_name is the name of the network (of course!), resource_type is either node or link, resource_name is the name of the node or link (e.g., El Cuchillo Reservoir), and attribute_name is the name of the variable (e.g., Storage Capacity).

For network attributes (global variables ascribed to the system as a whole, as opposed to a specific resource or facility):

"[network_name]/[attribute_name]"

Examples

Example 1: Get the runoff from a catchment in the current time step.

get("Monterrey/node/Catchment Rio San Juan/Runoff")

Example 2: Get the reservoir storage from the previous time step.

get("Monterrey/node/El Cuchillo/Storage", offset=-1)

Example 3: Get the mean runoff-to-date for the current water year.

start_date = "{year}-10-01".format(year=water_year-1)
get("Monterrey/node/Catchment Rio San Juan/Runoff", start=start_date, agg="mean")

read_csv

Read a CSV file from a specified path. For now, this is limited to reading from the current network's file storage (using AWS S3), as viewable in the OpenAgua app.

Returns a Pandas DataFrame object.

Since this function relies on Pandas read_csv, you can prepare and test your function outside of OpenAgua with your Python programming environment of choice, using Pandas instead of OpenAgua.

Arguments

This function uses the Pandas read_csv function (version 0.23.4), and generally accepts the same arguments, which will be passed through directly. The filepath_or_buffer argument of the native Pandas read_csv function should be replaced by the path argument. Some of the Pandas default argument values are over-ridden to accommodate the most typical CSV format, as shown in Example 1 below; these can still be changed in the function call. Arguments listed below include both over-ridden arguments and custom additional arguments.

Argument

Data type

Description

path (required)

string

The path of the data of interest.

index_col

integer or list

Pandas index_col argument. Default is 0.

parse_dates

boolean

Pandas parse_dates argument. Default is True.

flavor

string

The type of Python object to return. Options include native (a Python dictionary), pandas, and json. Note that this is not a Pandas read_csv argument. The default is native.

Returns

A Python data object that depends on the flavor argument. The default is a native Python dictionary (flavor='native').

Notes

For the time being, this must be called prepended with self. and with the last arguments as **kwargs, as in the examples below.

CSV files loaded using read_csv are cached, so loading the same CSV file from different functions will not significantly impact performance.

Examples

Example 1: Load inflow hydrology (all at once).

For this first example, let's assume we have a CSV file as follows:

Date,Hetch Hetchy
2007-10-10,52.116
2007-10-20,96.703
2007-10-31,51.93
2007-11-10,87.213
2007-11-20,72.233

This can be loaded using the default arguments, as:

self.read_csv("data/runoff.csv", **kwargs)

Since this function returns an entire time series (as a Python dictionary object by default), it will not be called again, as the data will already be readily available to the model. I.e., all data is loaded in one go. Note again that return is optional, so is omitted here.

Example 2: Load inflow hydrology (per time step).

data = self.read_csv("data/runoff.csv", usecols=[0,1], **kwargs)
return data.iloc[timestep-1][1]

This example loads the dataset within the function, but since it returns only a single value, it will be called again every time step. This can be useful if some time-dependent manipulation of the data is needed, but is generally less efficient than the approach in Example 1. Not that this uses the built-in variable timestep. Since Python objects are indexed starting at zero, but timestep starts at 1, when using the DataFrame iloc index method, timestep-1 must be used.

Contents
get
read_csv